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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 10:56 pm 
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Sponge

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:04 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Southampton
Well, yesterday I finally plucked up the courage to have a go.

I'm not sure I have done it correctly, but as I am practising on my 20 year old Land Rover it does not matter if I make a Horlicks of it.

Equipment:
DAS 6Pro+ polisher
Chemical Guys Hex Logic Orange Pad
Chemical Guys Hex Logic Green Pad
Chemical Guys Hex Logic Black Pad
Chemical Guys Hex Logic Red Pad
Bilt Hamber clay bar
Zymol Auto Wash
Meguiars 105
Meguiars 205
Clearkote Yellow Moose Wax
Chemical Guys Butter Wet Wax


I decided to dive in at the deep end and chose one of the worst panels on the Defender. This was the passenger door. This is badly oxidised and has evidence of poor paint application or failure.
Exhibit 1 m'lud, prior to washing.

Image

This is the door after washing and claying

Image

This is the clay after use

Image

Then it was time to use the polisher. I have to say I was not sure which pad to use, so I plumped for the orange one and applied five blobs of Meguiars 105 and spread it at speed 1 and then moved up to speed 5.
I was not sure when to finish, but did so after going side to side and up and down a couple of times.
I then buffed it up with a microfibre cloth.
Next I fitted the green pad and carried out the same process, but with Meguiars 205. Again not sure when exactly to finish and buffed with a cloth.

Here are the results

Image

I then fitted a black pad and went over the area with Clearkote Yellow Moose wax, but only running the polisher at speed 1.
After this I fitted a red pad and went over the area with Chemical Brothers Butter Wet Wax, again at speed 1

Here is the final result

Image

I have to say, that although I was terrified I would end up with no paint on the car, it was not as bad as I thought. The surface felt as smooth as glass and once I got to the stage of applying the Yellow Moose, it was encouraging to hear the pad making a squeaking noise as it stopped.

I have no idea if I have done anything in the correct manner, or even if I have used the correct combination of pads and product. But I do have to say I am impressed with the results.
It just goes to show you can polish a turd :)

I know the bottom of the door is not perfect, but this might be because the paint has some kind of failure.

Perhaps I could illicit some comments from the resident experts on here.

John

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 11:11 pm 
Cracking first go with machine polish :)

The Land Rover you have, has single stage paint and is fairly soft, so it can easily be polished up to an extremely high gloss.

The next time you machine polish, perhaps you will adjust your technique a little:

the paint was heavily oxidized to start with, so you may need to repeat the #105 stage and/or apply a little more pressure. To maximise #105, an 18" x18" square should take about 3 minutes and consist of 6 slightly overlapping passes in a crosshatched pattern.

The #205 is a final finishing polish, designed to crisp up the base compounding stage. To get the best out of #205 a totally different tecnique, called 'jewelling' is required.....

Put on your softest pad and set the machine to the lowest speed setting. Then extremely slowly move the pad over the paintwork and apply zero pressure.
This will enable the fine abrasives to refine the paint beneath it and maximise the gloss. You will notice that the pad head will meet far less, if any, resistance as the paint is flattened.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 11:32 pm 
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Sponge

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:04 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Southampton
Thanks for the encouraging response Willington.

I did wonder if the paint was single stage and not clear over base (not sure when the transition took place with Land Rover) as the initial pad turned quite blue after use.
I have to admit that I did not apply any pressure at all, so perhaps next time apply some. I will also give each section more than one go with the #205 perhaps, especially the bottom part of the door.

OK on the jewelling, I'll give that a go as well.

Not all of the paintwork on the car is as bad as this. The side panels and the bonnet are still quite shiny, so it will be interesting to see the difference.
Still, it is better to make my mistakes on this one before moving onto my Jaguar :)

John

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:48 am 
Mighty fine work there John, well done you :cool:

Great advice from Peter to get you going and now, I dare say you'll not want to stop.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:19 am 
You will find that machine polishing the paint on the Jag is TOTALLY different to the soft single stage paint the LR has.

You may want to get hold of a scrap panel, with a hard clearcoat on it, to practice upon BEFORE you start on the jag. The technique should remain the same, but the choice of polish/pads/machine speed/pressure required may differ.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:03 pm 
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Wash Mitt God

Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:56 pm
Posts: 1984
Location: Sheffield
Nice work John on the Landy.

Mark


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:54 am 
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Sponge

Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:04 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Southampton
willington wrote:
You will find that machine polishing the paint on the Jag is TOTALLY different to the soft single stage paint the LR has.

You may want to get hold of a scrap panel, with a hard clearcoat on it, to practice upon BEFORE you start on the jag. The technique should remain the same, but the choice of polish/pads/machine speed/pressure required may differ.


Yes I do realise the Jag will be different. For one the paintwork is in much better condition :D with only minor swirl marks and the odd light scratch and stone chip.
The intention is refine my technique before moving onto this car. Only taking baby steps at the moment.
However, I have certainly learnt that using a machine polisher is not as terrifying as I first imagined it to be.
Your great tip about jeweling will certainly be applied to the Jag, it being a black car I want it to be as shiny as possible.

My girlfriend's brother is a motor mechanic and he has a bent bonnet awaiting collection by the scrap man, so I might purloin that one :)

Torque wrote:
Mighty fine work there John, well done you :cool:


Great advice from Peter to get you going and now, I dare say you'll not want to stop.


Thanks. I cannot tell you how apprehensive I was when I first started polishing away [-o<
I can already see how addictive it could become. I am already eying up friends and neighbours cars :D

Mark M wrote:
Nice work John on the Landy.

Mark


Thanks Mark. The only worry about reviving the Landy is that it will make it more attractive to thieves :)
After all, they are the most stolen car in the UK at the moment :cry:
At least in it's present state it is not that desirable :lol:

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